Paris apartment

Step into a historic Parisian apartment full of charming details and antique pieces

It all started with a piano and a chance encounter in Paris. “The apartment has been in the family since the end of the 1970s,” explains the Beirut woman about her home, located not far from the Arc de Triomphe. “The previous owner had this piano and said, ‘If you want the apartment, you have to take the piano,’ because he didn’t want to move it. It then became the starting point for everything [that followed]. “

A funny anecdote, yes, but one of two fortuitous origin stories that are essential to understanding how the apartment came to exist in its present form. When asked how he and his client first connected, French architect Benoit Dupuis responded with a smile: “It was about 10 years ago, and it all happened in a boutique that I designed for Christian Louboutin in Paris. One of the customers asked the saleswoman who designed the store and if she could meet with me. I happened to be [right] there! ”At the time, Dupuis’ future client had said that she might have a potential project for him. A few years later, they reconnected and started working on the redesign of the apartment.

Right next to the main entrance is the bright breakfast room, where family antiques mingle with Edmond Petit seating. On the back wall hangs a work by Palestinian artist Mona Hatoum and on the ceiling is You pay by the artist collective Claire Fontaine. Dupuis designed the interior shutters.

“[It’s] in a Haussmannian building, ”explains Dupuis of the residence. “The place was a bit dark, but bourgeois and tasteful. The idea was to keep the historical elements, like the moldings, and to think about the art collection. The client, who now counts Dupuis as a personal friend, adds: “We have kept the integrity of the original space. [That’s] why I think it’s so lovely.

Above all, the duo took care to preserve the apartment’s keen eye for personal details. It’s packed with family memorabilia (the antique pieces originally belonged to the client’s aunt) and fun designs from the 1970s and 1980s. Many of these items date back to when the apartment was made in the originated by the Parisian decorator Jean-Dominique Bonhotal.

Step into a historic Parisian apartment full of charming details and antique pieces

The entrance to the apartment is treated like a gallery with works of art hanging on all the walls.  Right, a painting by American artist Matt Sheridan Smith.  On the back wall, which also doubles as a sliding door, is Cake Box, a 2015 artwork by British artist Sylvan Lionni Totem.  Sitting on a family console is a glass sculpture by Parisian artist Flavie Audi.  Above, a work by Welsh artist Cerith Wyn Evans can be seen.  The wool rug is from Codimat.
The entrance to the apartment is treated like a gallery with works of art hanging on all the walls. Right, a painting by American artist Matt Sheridan Smith. On the back wall, which also serves as a sliding door, is Cake Box, a 2015 work by British artist Sylvan Lionni Totem. Sitting on a family console is a glass sculpture by Parisian artist Flavie Audi. Above, a work by Welsh artist Cerith Wyn Evans can be seen. The wool rug is Codimat.
Directly to the left of the entrance is the main living room.  The room is filled with an eclectic combination of vintage pieces, heirlooms, and contemporary art.  It features a coffee table by Danish designer Poul Kjaerholm, rosewood chairs by Norwegian designer Hans Brattrud and a sculptural low armchair by Joe Colombo.  The series of sofas is inspired by an existing model and is redesigned by the architect Benoit Dupuis, who has them covered with a silk velvet by Edmond Petit.  The hanging artworks are from left to right by Jurgen Drescher, Jim Lambie, Louise Lawler and Latifa Echakhch.  The piano came with the apartment.  The flower arrangements were designed by Arturo Arita.
Directly to the left of the entrance is the main living room. The room is filled with an eclectic combination of vintage pieces, heirlooms, and contemporary art. It features a coffee table by Danish designer Poul Kjaerholm, rosewood chairs by Norwegian designer Hans Brattrud and a sculptural low armchair by Joe Colombo. The series of sofas is inspired by an existing model and is redesigned by the architect Benoit Dupuis who has them covered with a silk velvet of Edmond Petit. The hanging artworks are from left to right by Jurgen Drescher, Jim Lambie, Louise Lawler and Latifa Echakhch. The piano came with the apartment. The flower arrangements were designed by Arturo Arita.
Another view of the main living room.  The leather seat is by Danish designer Poul Kjaerholm.  A work by the artist collective Reena Spaulings hangs nearby.

Another view of the main living room. The leather seat is by Danish designer Poul Kjaerholm. A work by the artist collective Reena Spaulings hangs nearby.

Right next to the main entrance is the bright breakfast room, where family antiques mingle with Edmond Petit seating.  On the back wall hangs a work by Palestinian artist Mona Hatoum and on the ceiling, You Pay by the artist collective Claire Fontaine.  Dupuis designed the interior shutters.

Right next to the main entrance is the bright breakfast room, where family antiques mingle with Edmond Petit seating. On the back wall hangs a work by Palestinian artist Mona Hatoum and on the ceiling is You pay by the artist collective Claire Fontaine. Dupuis designed the interior shutters.

A long bench by Italian architect Osvaldo Borsani for Techno, designed for Malpensa Airport in Milan, helps anchor the dining room.  The table is a piece by George Nelson for Herman Miller.  On the wall, a large work by artist Walead Beshty and Speech Bubble by German artist Jurgen Drescher.
A long bench by the Italian architect Osvaldo Borsani for Techno, which was designed for Malpensa Airport in Milan, helps anchor the dining room. The table is a George Nelson for Herman Miller room. On the wall is a large work by artist Walead Beshty and Bubble by German artist Jurgen Drescher.
Vintage Martinelli Luce wall lights and unbrushed stainless steel worktop make the kitchen shine.  A “steak” by Swiss artist Nicolas Party sits on the counter.
Old Martinelli Luce the wall lights and the unbrushed stainless steel worktop make the kitchen shine. A “steak” by Swiss artist Nicolas Party is on the counter.
All the rooms are lined up one after the other, with windows facing the street.  The Edmond Petit fabric and the Codimat carpet are used again.  On the bed is a Suzani tray while the rosewood chair was designed by Hans Brattrud.  Dupuis created the cupboards and storage spaces.

All the rooms are lined up one after the other, with windows facing the street. The Edmond Petit fabric and the Codimat carpet are used again. On the bed is a Suzani tray while the rosewood chair was designed by Hans Brattrud. Dupuis created the cupboards and storage spaces.

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“What we did was mix it all up with things that were really close to my heart,” explains the client, noting that they took care to keep the soul of the house intact while refreshing it a bit. . “We added mid-century pieces and Benoit designed the built-in closets. They have no feet so they seem to be floating. I wanted everything to be light and almost transparent.

Dupuis confirms that the specifications he received were to light up the space while keeping its circulation fluid. The four rooms are aligned in a way that is not unlike that of a hotel. Everything seems to disappear in the walls. Ultimately, the general feeling is one of cool and understated French modernism.

In the midst of this serene canvas, contemporary works of art easily appear. Most of the parts, which were bought all over Europe, had been in storage for a long time. “When we opened the checkouts, the most magical thing happened,” recalls the customer. “Everything was as if it had been bought especially for the apartment. It was a fantastic feeling. We placed every piece! Another example of French serendipity.

Originally appeared on Architectural summary


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